Conservation Genetics research at BGPA addresses genetic issues underpinning practical outcomes in the conservation and recovery of rare and threatened native plant species, and for the ecological restoration of degraded native landscapes under the care and management of BGPA, and across the state. Research is also focused more broadly in molecular ecology, and particularly on the key processes influencing genetic variation and evolution within and among native plant populations. Research extends to identifying significant units for management and conservation, and the evolutionary relationships among these taxa, using modern molecular tools.

Biological diversity means the variability among living organisms from all sources - this includes diversity within species, between species and of ecosystems. Thus, for the conservation of biological diversity, genetic variation within species is of equal importance to variation among species and ecosystems. An understanding of not only the amount and geographic patterning of genetic variation within species, but also the processes that effect genetic variation and the consequences of an erosion of genetic variation, are critical for the management, conservation and restoration of biodiversity.

The Conservation Genetics team is headed by Senior Research Scientist Dr Siegy Krauss, and currently comprises six externally funded research scientists and five PhD students. Significant research outcomes have been achieved with research funding from the Australian Research Council and industry partners, through extensive and productive collaborations, and through an integrated team approach to practical outcomes in conservation biology achieved at BGPA.

Please contact Dr Siegy Krauss with enquiries relating to Conservation Genetics.