Research into plant propagation techniques has been a long-term activity at Kings Park and Botanic Garden. This research enables the Authority to produce clonal material through cuttings, grafting and tissue culture to deliver the best outcome for display and conservation. This research can then be translated into techniques for commercial production.

Verticordia grandisThrough this research, the number of Western Australian species effectively propagated through cuttings has increased dramatically over the past ten years - the benefits of which are now being delivered in the wider array of species available for display and production.

The development of grafting techniques and combinations for Western Australian species has also identified suitable rootstocks and scion combinations that has allowed a wider range of plants to be displayed in the gardens at Kings Park and Botanic Garden, and used in general horticulture. Grafting is particularly useful for the cultivation of many desirable forms of plants that have weak root systems, are susceptible to soil-borne diseases (such as Phytophthora), are intolerant of different soil pH, or are very difficult to produce through cuttings or tissue culture.

Kings Park and Botanic Garden is now able to display an amazing array of species from such genera as Eremophila, Boronia, Verticordia, Prostanthera, Grevillea, Hemiandra,Pimelea and Diplolaena, which could not be cultivated previously.