Agonis flexuosa ‘variegata’

Common name: Variegated WA Weeping Peppermint

Family: MYRTACEAE

Origin of Scientific Name

Leaves of the Agonis Flexuosa 'variegata' can grow up to 15 cm long. Photo: D. Blumer.View image slideshow

Agonis – derived from the Greek agon, meaning gathering or collection, in reference to the tightly clustered flowers.

flexuosa – from the Latin, flexuosus, bending or curving in a zig-zag manner.

Description

The Agonis flexuosa ‘variegata’ differs from other known forms of this species in its variegated foliage. It is usually single trunked and grows to around 5 m tall. The bark is fibrous, brown and branchlets are pendulous. Leaves are 5 – 15 cm, narrowed at both ends with a variegation consisting of a yellow border varying in width. Flowers are white and about 1 cm in diameter, grouped in axillary clusters of 8-10 flowers along branchlets. Seed capsule is woody, globular clustered and about 0.5 cm in diameter.

Distribution

A. flexuosa occurs naturally only in south Western Australia. Refer to the distribution map for this species via the Department of Parks and Wildlife's FloraBase online herbarium.

Flowering Season

September to December

Cultivation/Propagation

A. flexuosa ‘variegata’ has been cultivated for many years however it is not readily available. It must be propagated vegetatively from cuttings, which can be slow and difficult to strike, or alternatively by grafting onto green foliage seedlings. It is slow growing and must be watered regularly during dry periods to prevent foliage burn. It will respond well to pruning after flowering if required. Best grown in full sun or part shade, it will tolerate most soil types and is lime tolerant.

Notes

With maturity, this tree has a graceful dome shape and weeping habit. It would make a beautiful feature tree in the garden with its striking foliage colour. The foliage often looks a little shabby during the winter months but will respond well as the weather warms up with a new flush of vibrant growth.

View in Kings Park

This species can be seen outside the Tuart Toilets, near Tuart Lawn within the Western Australian Botanic Garden