Current and ongoing research projects include:

  • ARC Linkage project (LP0561956), Em/Prof JA McComb (Murdoch University); Dr E Bunn; Dr KW Dixon (BGPA). In vitro propagation (through somatic embryogenesis) of rush and sedge species important for land rehabilitation. Total of $220,000 over 3 yrs. Partner Organization(s): Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority, Worsley Refinery, Seed Solutions (Administering Institution: Murdoch University).

  • Investigation of propagation methods for Lomandra spp. (Honours project) in collaboration with BGPA, MU and Worsley Mining.

  • Investigation of in vitro propagation methods for initiating culture lines of selected rush and sedge species for mining restoration, in collaboration with Worsley Mining (WAPL).

  • Micropropagation of plants of Synaphea stenoloba, a critically endangered species from the Pinjarra district. The plants being produced by Kings Park are part of a collaborative project involving Kings Park, ALCOA, UWA and CALM, to firstly, establish ex situ collections of tissue cultured plants, followed by micropropagation of plants for the future recovery of this very rare species.

  • Micropropagation of plants of Symonanthus bancroftii (Bancroft's Symonanthus), a critically endangered species from the Bruce Rock district. The plants produced by Kings Park are part of a translocation project to restore populations of this extremely rare species to the natural habitat. This is a collaborative project between Kings Park, CALM (Narrogin District), Bruce Rock LandCare, Bruce Rock Shire and local volunteers. This project has received funding support from World Wildlife Fund (WWF) through a Threatened Species Network (TSN) grant in 2003 and 2005, administered through Bruce Rock LandCare and Bruce Rock Shire.

  • Micropropagation of plants of Synaphea quartzitica (Quartz loving synaphea), a critically endangered species from the Moora district. The plants being produced by Kings Park are part of a collaborative project involving Kings Park and CALM (Moora District), which has so far resulted in successful establishment of ex situ collections of tissue cultured plants. Micropropagated plants have been used in a trial reintroduction project in 2005. This project is aimed at preventing the extinction of this extremely rare species.

  • Micropropagation of plants of Grevillea scapigera (Corrigin grevillea), a critically endangered species from the Corrigin district. Plants of the Corrigin grevillea produced by Kings Park have been translocated to field sites near the hinterland of Corrigin and new populations have been successfully restored to the natural habitat. This project is a collaborative project comprising Kings Park, CALM (Narrogin District), Corrigin LandCare and local volunteers.

  • Cryogenic research is continuing with new species undergoing screening for cryostorage potential. This is an ongoing program with the aim of placing key germplasm samples of critically endangered plants into long-term cryogenic storage. The cryogenic methods developed by Kings Park were the first such studies for indigenous Australian plants (Touchell et al, 2002a, 2002b).

  • Investigation of in vitro propagation of endangered plant species continues to be a significant research program and is primarily aimed at critically endangered taxa in urgent need of ex situ conservation and where other (conventional) means of propagation are not feasible.