Eucalyptus marginata

Common name: Jarrah

Family: MYRTACEAE

Eucalyptus marginata is endemic to the south-west region of Western Australia. Photo: D. Blumer.View image slideshow

Origin of Scientific Name

Eucalyptus: eu (Greek), meaning well and calyptos (Greek), meaning covered referring to the cap which covers the developing flowers.

Marginatus (Latin), meaning furnished with a border. Refers to the thickened margin of the leaves.

Description

This magnificent tree can grow up to 50 m tall and is endemic to the south-west region of Western Australia. Towering forests of Jarrah can be found from the Albany region on the south coast to Gingin north of Perth.

The trunk of this tree is long and straight, has few branches, and can grow to a width of 3 m. It has been extensively logged for its dark red hardwood timber but it makes a fine specimen tree and provides habitat for native fauna. Jarrah has greyish coloured bark with vertical furrows. One of the oldest specimens of Jarrah can be found in Manjimup, dating approximately 500 years.

Jarrah tree leaves are 8-13 cm long, curved in shape and with a lighter coloured vein tracing the perimeter of the leaf. Its growth habit forms a shady canopy which has the potential to inhibit the growth of any seedlings below.

When in bud, the shape of the cap is of a cone, and then comes a beautiful display of strongly scented white-cream flowers from June to January. These flowers attract many types of bees, marsupials and birds. Flowers are usually found in groups of seven to eleven.

Horticultural tips

  • This tree is defenceless against Dieback, a soil-borne fungal disease.
  • The Jarrah has a lignotuber giving it the ability to re-shoot after fire.
  • Suitable for planting in large gardens but may be sensitive to previous phosphorus fertiliser applications to the soil.

View in Kings Park

Visit Kings Park and Botanic Garden to see the Jarrah in its tall and shady splendour within the Kings Park bushland, at various locations within the parkland and in the Western Australian Botanic Garden (refer to map). A new road side avenue of Jarrah trees has recently been planted at Poole Avenue in Kings Park for future generations to enjoy.

Want more information?

Refer to the profile for this plant on the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions' FloraBase online herbarium.

Jarrah tree (Eucalyptus marginata) growing in Kings Park. Photo: D. Blumer. Red-tailed black cockatoos on Eucalyptus marginata. Photo: D. Blumer. Jarrah nuts. Photo: D. Blumer. The impressive displays of flowers attract bees and other insects. Photo: D. Blumer.

Naturescape closed February

Rio Tinto Naturescape Kings Park will be closed from Friday, 1 February 2019 until Friday, 1 March 2019.

Concert traffic interruptions

Road and carpark closures will occur in Kings Park and Botanic Garden from December 2018 until May 2019 due to concert events.

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Family-friendly fun in 2019

Zippy's Kings Park Adventures is now open for 2019 bookings, so don’t miss this popular new program for little nature lovers aged three to five years!

Aspects' new Corporate Gift Guide

Aspects of Kings Park Gallery Shop is pleased to launch an update of their Corporate Gift Guide.

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