Acacia StepsView venue slideshow

Opened in September 1998, these cascading stone steps feature six wattle species inset with botanical mosaics, picked out in granite and marble. Seed pods of each flower are depicted on the steps, which were designed and built by artist Stuart Green.

Cascading stone steps provide a lovely staircase entry for a wedding or naming ceremony. Nestled within the beautiful surroundings of the Acacia Garden, this is a very picturesque site for a function.

Suited to
Weddings, film and photography
Capacity
200 people
Parking
Botanic Garden Carpark, Forrest Drive
Access
Short walk across grass, may be unsuitable for guests with limited mobility
Services
Perth Explorer Bus stop nearby
Toilets
Approximately 200 m, available at carpark
Power
Not available
Shelter
Not available
Seating
Not available
Refreshments
Approximately 1 km to Fraser Avenue precinct or 2 km to May Drive Parkland
Barbecues
Not available
Booking times
9.00 am - 6.00 pm daily
Bookings
Please contact the Bookings Officer
Location
Western Australian Botanic Garden
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Acacia steps Acacia steps

Tags: Function type: Weddings,Film and photography
Park precinct area: WA Botanic Garden
Venue capacity: 150 - 200

Saw Avenue access disruption

Visitor disruptions will occur in the Saw Avenue Picnic Area from Monday 25 March 2019 due to toilet facilities upgrade works.

Bold Park access disruption: Kulbardi Walk

Kulbardi Walk will be closed from 7.00 am to 5.00 pm, Monday to Friday from Monday 18 March to Friday 12 April 2019.

Earth Hour 2019

The lights that illuminate the Lemon scented gums along Fraser Avenue be turned off during Earth Hour, which begins at 8.30 pm on Saturday, 30 March 2019.

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Kings Park Science’s 2018-19 Summer Scholarship Program recently wrapped up after another successful summer.

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