Old Tea PavilionView venue slideshow old tea pavilion internal d blumer old tea pavilion trees d blumer

Originally situated on the lower terraces of Mount Eliza in 1899 and opened in 1900, the Tea House (also known as the Terraces Tearooms) was moved to Fraser Avenue in 1919, and used as a rest pavilion for the Returned Servicemen.

It was refurbished in 1998 and still retains many of the original tiles imported from Marseille in France. With majestic views overlooking the Swan River and the city of Perth, the Old Tea Pavilion is a beautiful location for a function.

Suited to
Social and family functions, community groups, corporate functions, weddings, film and photography
Capacity
80 people
Parking
Pines Picnic Carpark, directly behind venue
Access
Drop off available directly at venue
Services
Public transport bus stop close by, Fraser Avenue tourist precinct
Toilets
Opposite venue, across entry road
Power
Available
Shelter
Available
Seating
Limited seating
Refreshments
Approximately 250 m to Fraser Avenue tourist precinct
Barbecues
Available nearby at Pines Picnic Area to all park users; cannot be reserved as part of your booking
Booking times
Available 9.00 am - 6.00 pm daily
Bookings
Please contact the Bookings Officer
Location
Fraser Avenue Precinct
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Legend: Past  Available  Some Availability  Unavailable 

Saw Avenue access disruption

Visitor disruptions will occur in the Saw Avenue Picnic Area from Monday 25 March 2019 due to toilet facilities upgrade works.

Bold Park access disruption: Kulbardi Walk

Kulbardi Walk will be closed from 7.00 am to 5.00 pm, Monday to Friday from Monday 18 March to Friday 12 April 2019.

Earth Hour 2019

The lights that illuminate the Lemon scented gums along Fraser Avenue be turned off during Earth Hour, which begins at 8.30 pm on Saturday, 30 March 2019.

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Kings Park Science’s 2018-19 Summer Scholarship Program recently wrapped up after another successful summer.

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