Tawny frogmouths in Kings Park. Photo: D. Blumer.View image slideshow

Kings Park bushland provides a corridor benefit to local birds and invertebrates, allowing the continuation of species migration through the urban environment. There are over seventy bird species, twenty reptile species and hundreds of different invertebrates in Kings Park bushland. The Kings Park Bird Guide identifies some of the more common species likely to be encountered in Kings Park and Botanic Garden and is available for download via the brochures section.

The Brushtail Possum (Trichosurus vulpecula), Quenda (Isoodon obesulus) and a number of bat species represent the native mammals of the Park. Kings Park supports a rare population and habitat of native snail, Bothriembryon indutus (Scarp Snail). Usually the species occurs along the Darling Range, which has a granite and lateritic environment. The disjunct population in Kings Park bushland exists on limestone cliffs.

The trapdoor spider, Aganippe rhaphiduca, although not rare, has 'localised' population differences in Kings Park. Usually it occurs on the Darling Scarp and in Jarrah forest to Albany.

Bearded dragon, Pogona species. Photo: D. Blumer. thumb australian raven d blumer thumb dragonfly d blumer Australian painted lady, Vanessa kershawi. Photo: D. Blumer. thumb ducklings d blumer Tawny frogmouth. Photo: D. Blumer. Pacific black duck family

Kings Park visitor disruption: tree works

Visitor disruptions may occur in the Fraser Avenue precinct, Kings Park between Monday 18 March and Friday 22 March 2019 due to essential tree works.

Bold Park access disruption

Reabold Hill Boardwalk in Bold Park will be closed due to essential maintenance on Thursday 21 March 2019.

Bold Park access disruption: Kulbardi Walk

Kulbardi Walk will be closed from 7.00 am to 5.00 pm, Monday to Friday from Monday 18 March to Friday 12 April 2019.

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Summer Scholarship Program

Kings Park Science’s 2018-19 Summer Scholarship Program recently wrapped up after another successful summer.

More quendas, bigger plants

Western Australian quendas (Isoodon fusciventer) aren’t just cute and quirky, their digging and fossicking habits have been found to make an incredible difference in the growth of plants, according to new research.

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